A quick and easy breakfast idea

July 12, 2011

The biggest headache most people have when trying to make wholesale changes to their nutrition is what to do for breakfast.  Despite knowing what to eat, it’s not always easy to find the time (or for some, the stomach) to actually prepare and eat breakfast.  So what are the options?

For me, breakfast is as lunch would be and I eat according to how I feel that morning. And to some extent, I also have to go with what is practical given my morning schedule.  My favourite breakfast is Laverstoke Park wild boar and bacon burgers, a handful of raw nuts, and an apple. (If you haven’t tried the Laverstoke Farm products, I strongly urge you to do so).

But the reality of 7am gym commitments is that I don’t always have the luxury of time to sit and enjoy breakfast.  That being the case, I revert to the famous Vacassin breakfast smoothie.

Ingredients:

200ml coconut water (can use rice/almond/hazelnut milk)

4 raw eggs (No, you can’t taste them.  And yes, they’re safe if they’e organic.  If you’re not convinced, substitute these for 30-40g of protein from powder)

1 teaspoon of nut butter (preferably not peanut)

A small handful of berries

1/2 a small banana (exclude if your goal is fat loss)

A generous handful of spinach and/or a greens powder

Put all of these ingredients in a blender, whizz thoroughly, job done.

A very quick and convenient way to get good fats, adequate protein, modest carb content and plenty of essential nutrients whilst you’re short on time.

Try it and let me know what you think.  Enjoy.


Comments

  1. Rob Watts - July 12, 2011 at 12:47 pm -

    Jean-Claude. i’ve just read your breakfast blog, and i’m confused about protien intake in one go. i’ve read and heard 3 different things: 1: ten grams an hour is all the body can process. 2: 30 gramms at a time, 3: min of 50 grams for breakfast. any resolution?

    • Mithun - May 22, 2012 at 8:13 pm -

      The jury seems to be out and the discussion goes way beonyd a blog interaction. But .The research based fraternity will tell you that you cannot process more than 30g of protein in a sitting. I’m not sure who this 30g is based upon (it can’t be for everyone surely?), but it doesn’t seem to hold up in practice.Practically, athletes, bodybuilders and physique models consume way above this in a sitting presumably because it works for them. These guys also consume a lot more protein overall than is the mainstream recommendation. Again, because it works for them.I think you also need to consider all other factors. There’s no doubt that if you are exercising intensely and regularly you need more protein. Increased protein intake plays a vital role in repair and recovery. I think its also true to say that if you restrict any other macronutrient food groups (typically carbs), you need to replace these with other food protein?I advocate higher amounts of protein in the morning, particularly because it’s widely believed that the first 30-50g of protein goes towards immune system function. (Although I’m also an advocate of Intermittent Fasting in some cases which excludes breakfast completely!)To throw numbers out as a standard model is simplistic. It depends entirely on the person, their goals and many other factors. Personally, I consume 60g of protein post workout. Outside of this window I eat according to appetite and activity. In practice, most people who follow a decent nutritional program will include adequate protein by default. So my approach is to get people eating clean, addressing calories and grams of protein only after the basics have been nailed down.

  2. Jean-Claude - July 14, 2011 at 6:23 pm -

    @Rob – The jury seems to be out and the discussion goes way beyond a blog interaction. But….

    The research based fraternity will tell you that you cannot process more than 30g of protein in a sitting. I’m not sure who this 30g is based upon (it can’t be for everyone surely?), but it doesn’t seem to hold up in practice.

    Practically, athletes, bodybuilders and physique models consume way above this in a sitting – presumably because it works for them. These guys also consume a lot more protein overall than is the mainstream recommendation. Again, because it works for them.

    I think you also need to consider all other factors. There’s no doubt that if you are exercising intensely and regularly you need more protein. Increased protein intake plays a vital role in repair and recovery. I think its also true to say that if you restrict any other macronutrient food groups (typically carbs), you need to replace these with other food – protein?

    I advocate higher amounts of protein in the morning, particularly because it’s widely believed that the first 30-50g of protein goes towards immune system function. (Although I’m also an advocate of Intermittent Fasting in some cases – which excludes breakfast completely!)

    To throw numbers out as a standard model is simplistic. It depends entirely on the person, their goals and many other factors. Personally, I consume 60g of protein post workout. Outside of this window I eat according to appetite and activity.

    In practice, most people who follow a decent nutritional program will include adequate protein by default. So my approach is to get people eating clean, addressing calories and grams of protein only after the basics have been nailed down.